journalism Archives -
Home Tags Journalism

Tag: journalism

Here’s some news on Newsmodo and Superman, too!

Newsmodo is a new resource that pools the talents of professional journalists, videographers, and others to break stories at break-neck speeds. Legit newsrooms can search for an purchase white-hot, fresh stories from around the globe for use in the full spectrum of digital and legacy media platforms. When contributors capture something newsworthy, they set a price and upload the images, footage and/or story to Newsmodo’s marketplace. Newsmodo facilitates the sale, copyright exchange and payments across all currencies.

Why your press releases are treated like spam [Five ways to alienate a journalist]

Having run free PR and media leads service SourceBottle for just over a 18 months, I’ve gathered some rare insights into the minds of journalists and what will lead to a figurative black mark against your name. The average journalist will receive from 20 to 200 PR news releases per day. And, as a result, most are treated like spam. Are your media releases the PR equivalent to penis enlargement emails and Nigerian scams?

Iceland: From boom to bust to haven to where-the-bloody-hell-are-you?

Being a single industry economy is notoriously dangerous. And few countries understand this better than Iceland. Not wanting to remain in the doldrums, Iceland is trying to re-brand itself as a journalistic haven, centre of creativity and popular tourist destination. Cue cart-wheeling citizens.

Monthly first Australian magazine to confirm plans to launch iPad edition. Should we be...

The media release was destined to arrive sooner or later. Who would be the first Australian print magazine to announce definitive plans to launch an iPad edition? The answer came today. Current affairs title The Monthly made the slightly self-conscious announcement that it "is believed to be the first Australian magazine to confirm an iPad edition ready for the tablet’s 28 May Australian launch, or soon after."

Could SME business owners soon become the new media barons?

After reading Matthew De Silva's post yesteday on last month’s Media 2010 conference, I spent the evening thinking about the challenges facing old media. As I pondered, I was struck by a radical (yet logical) series of thoughts, leading to the following question. Could small business owners soon become the new media barons? Let me explain.

The New York Times gets a Daily Show dacking

For all the sober analysis and prognostication being offered about the troubles facing the newspaper industry, often the most revealing truths surface through satire....

Anthill seeks part-time rabble-rousers

Are you an active or aspiring blogger, with exciting, inspiring, erudite, informative things to say, yet feel frustrated at how hard it has become...

What the newspaper industry needs to do to survive

Frankly, it sounds like newspapers are struggling to understand the opportunities and rules that govern the online world. There is a whole generation that has grown up with the concept of freemium economics. Try to charge them for something they have always had for free and you’ll lose them altogether. They need to remember that their main customers are advertisers.

Wanna meet and interview a big name entrepreneur?

Every edition of Anthill Magazine invariably features an interview (or two) with a big name Australian entrepreneur or thought leader from a country abroad. For...

Cory Doctorow’s big tent

It was an outrage. In March, celebrity US blogger Arrianna Huffington caused a squall of controversy when she cobbled together quotes criticising the Iraq war from various articles and interviews with George Clooney, gained approval from Clooney's publicist and ran the post on thehuffingtonpost.com under Clooney's name, with a few of her own words tossed in for good measure. It was perceived as an assault on the central tenets of journalistic professionalism and drew fire from many quarters (leading to her qualified apology when the great man arced up). But The Huffington Post is a blog, not a newspaper of record, and Ms Huffington had as many defenders as accusers during the affair.

Cory Doctorow's big tent

It was an outrage. In March, celebrity US blogger Arrianna Huffington caused a squall of controversy when she cobbled together quotes criticising the Iraq war from various articles and interviews with George Clooney, gained approval from Clooney's publicist and ran the post on thehuffingtonpost.com under Clooney's name, with a few of her own words tossed in for good measure. It was perceived as an assault on the central tenets of journalistic professionalism and drew fire from many quarters (leading to her qualified apology when the great man arced up). But The Huffington Post is a blog, not a newspaper of record, and Ms Huffington had as many defenders as accusers during the affair.

FREE BUSINESS TOOLS

FREE BUSINESS TOOL

INFOGRAPHICS

OPINIONS & ADVICE