young entrepreneur Archives - Page 2 of 4 -
Home Tags Young entrepreneur

Tag: young entrepreneur

Steve McLeod, 2010 Anthill 30under30 Winner

In 2007, at age 23, Steve McLeod parlayed a background in emergency response into a company that became Fire and Safety Australia, which offers workplace training in every state and territory on the continent. Today, Fire and Safety Australia has 11 full-time employees and six casual staff, and McLeod serves as managing director. He also has 16 co-providers who run safety-training business as licensees of his company.

Dorothy Polka, 2010 Anthill 30under30 Winner

Polka Dot Bride, started three ago by a now-25-year-old entrepreneur, is an online marketplace and inspiration clearinghouse for Australian couples preparing to say "I do." The business was started in 2007 by a Sydney-area woman who is now 25 years old and and who carefully maintains her anonymity on her site and on this profile (Dorothy Polka -- Dot Polka ... get it? On her site, she goes by Ms. Polka).

Dwayne Martens, 2010 Anthill 30under30 Winner

"I bring a new era of business ethos," says Dwayne Martens, owner of the health-food company Amazonia. "I am absolutely passionate to show conscious business is more powerful and more effective than the dollar-driven business." As for the bottom line, Amazonia moved $300,000 in product in August, and totaled $2.4 million in sales in 2009. Martens hopes to crack the $3 million mark soon.

Jack Delosa, 2010 Anthill 30under30 Winner

What truly sets apart the 23-year-old Jack Delosa is that he's driven to bring more budding entrepreneurs into the fold. His latest venture, The Entourage, aims at inspiring and developing up-and-comers while linking them to mentors and potential investors. In Delosa's words, it "connects Australia's best entrepreneurs with Australia's next entrepreneurs."

Jack Fitzgerald, 2010 Anthill 30under30 Winner

At age 23, Jack Fitzgerald is well on his way to never having to call someone "boss." And for that, he rejoices. "Working for someone else sounded like a jail sentence. I had to create a business or join the 9-to-5," he says. The result was Ship 2 Anywhere, a website that allows people to compare shipping costs of top couriers.

Brad Smith, 2010 Anthill 30under30 Winner

Mini-motorcross has been a driving force for Brad Smith. Over five years, starting with his own money and funds from his family, the 23-year-old Tasmanian has built an offroad motorcycle empire that includes four stores, his own bike design, four tracks, a race series, 40 employees and a United States distribution deal.

Tarik Houchar, 2010 Anthill 30under30 Winner

Twenty-one year-old Tarik Houchar says his Sydney store Muslim fashion is "committed to the modern, fashion-loving Muslim girl. It provides fashionable, modern hijabs and Islamic fashion in a fun, exciting retail environment." Some of these words might seem at odds with hijab. But Houchar clearly knows where the lines are drawn and what young Muslim women want.

Sheng Yeo, 2010 Anthill 30under30 Winner

Yeo's startup OrionVM sells computing infrastructure as a service through the Internet -- the cloud. The result? Here's Yeo's assessment: "We have spent $30,000 to $40,000 building up a system that others spend hundreds of thousands on. Australian companies using an Australian platform don't have to deal with the 250-millisecond delay from hosting content in the United States." Hey, that's a computing eternity.

Dane Mitchell, 2010 Anthill 30under30 Winner

Fitness trainer and personal-health businessman Dane Mitchell is on a fast track. Mitchell employs six people at Peak Health, and figures he's within a year of being able to step away from day-to-day operations so he can focus completely on growing the business.

Sacha Krjatian, 2010 Anthill 30under30 Winner

In his final year of high school, amid preparations for his Higher School Certificate exams, Sacha Krjatian's home life crumbled. He was forced to live with family friends for nearly months, and shifted to different homes four times. Krjatian's biggest opportunity would be one of his own making.

Ravi Moerman, 2010 Anthill 30under30 Winner

At the tender age of 19, Ravi Moerman runs his own freelance sound-editing company. He provides sound design, editing and mixing primarily for government-funded short films and advertising agencies. In fact, the South Australian Film Corporation recently tapped Moerman for a project to support feature film "The Dragon Pearl," starring Sam Neill.

Nikki Durkin, 2010 Anthill 30under30 Winner

Nikki Durkin, 19, harnessed the power of Facebook to spread the word of the 99dresses concept. She held a Facebook event that described the idea and asked who might be interested. Within two weeks, 20,000 women had been invited. She then launched a fan page for 99dresses (which still didn't exist as a website) with 2,000 fans.

Aonghus Stevens, 2010 Anthill 30under30 Winner

Aonghus Stevens is the sole owner of UAVs Australia, a two-year-old company that provides all manner of remote-controlled aircraft clients that range from farmers to the Australian Federal Police. And he's only 17!

Does brokepacker.com deserve to be our website-of-the-week?

According to the brokepacker.com founder Kevin Lippy, backpackers are only interested in three things: "Beer, sex and cheap deals." And he should know. Last month, we quoted another of Kevin's 'off-the-cuff' remarks as a Tequila Shot when he described his recent achievement moving into a youth hostel as a form of career advancement. (Of course, his goal was to gain a better understanding of his audience.)

Hey Baby-Boomers… We are sick of your ‘booming’. (Why young entrepreneur programs are NOT...

As a Master of Throwing Rocks, I understand why boomers might want to attack young entrepreneurship programs. But if these loud-mouths can forget about unfair for a moment (yes, it’s not nice losing your place as the centre of attention), they might learn why programs of this type are so important.

Hey Baby-Boomers… We are sick of your 'booming'. (Why young entrepreneur programs are NOT...

As a Master of Throwing Rocks, I understand why boomers might want to attack young entrepreneurship programs. But if these loud-mouths can forget about unfair for a moment (yes, it’s not nice losing your place as the centre of attention), they might learn why programs of this type are so important.

Three things every Australian startup needs to do this June

This month, in extreme contrast to the harsh winters of yesteryear, Australian startup entrepreneurs could almost be described as 'spoilt for choice'. In fact, my inbox is currently brimming with initiatives designed to promote and support entrepreneurship, seeking Anthill's support.

NSW seeks young entrepreneurs for Round Table series

Are you a business owner under 35 living in New South Wales? Industry & Investment NSW is inviting young NSW entrepreneurs to a Round Table event on Friday 4 Jun 2010 (3pm to 5pm). This event was developed to help the NSW Government gain a better understanding of the hurdles and expectations of young people who are starting and running a business.

Young Entrepreneurs’ Night Out. It’s baaaaaack! (But slightly different.)

Two months ago, we trialled an event in Sydney called our Young Entrepreneurs' Night Out. The premise was simple; Create a networking event for young entrepreneurs to mingle, learn from peers, drink some booze, make new friends and get inspired. It’s baaaaaack! (But slightly different.)

Young Entrepreneurs' Night Out. It's baaaaaack! (But slightly different.)

Two months ago, we trialled an event in Sydney called our Young Entrepreneurs' Night Out. The premise was simple; Create a networking event for young entrepreneurs to mingle, learn from peers, drink some booze, make new friends and get inspired. It’s baaaaaack! (But slightly different.)

FREE BUSINESS TOOLS

FREE BUSINESS TOOL

INFOGRAPHICS

OPINIONS & ADVICE